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WELCOME

Climate change and sea level rise is increasingly on the agenda of the public, the media, and decision makers in the public, private and social sectors of society. Focus is almost solely on the hazards and the potential disasters we might be facing. MARI at Old Dominion University is focusing on the solutions, the options we have to mitigate the impacts of climate change and sea level rise, and to adapt to the changes.

To develop the paractice-relevant solutions, MARI engages in research that produces the practice-relevant knowledge needed to cope with the impacts of climate change and sea level rise on the coastal zone and the urban coast in particular. In doing so, MARI responds to the knowledge needs of a wide range of community stakeholders, including government, military, private sector, and citizens. The high rate of local sea level rise, the exposure to extreme weather events, and the complex socio-economic structure makes Hampton Roads a natural laboratory for climate change and sea level rise. MARI utilizes this laboratory and works with stakeholders within and outside the region to generate the knowledge that can enable them not only to reduce the negative impacts but also to utilize the opportunities in the changes to come. To ensure that the stakeholders get the knowledge they can apply, MARI works closely with them to ensure a co-creation of practice-relevant knowledge and to support them in the use of this knowledge.


ANNOUNCEMENTS

Read the full story about MARI ...

Read more about the Hampton Roads Pilot Projects that is currently developed ...

UPCOMING EVENTS
  • CCPO/MARI Seminar: Monday, September 22, 2014, 3:30 PM, IRP2: The next seminar in the joint Mitigation and Adaptation Research Institute (MARI) and the Center for Coastal Physical Oceanography (CCPO) seminar series will be given by Dr. Sarah Cooley, Ocean Conservancy, Washington, DC, who will speak about “So what do we DO about ocean acidification?” For more information, see here ...

  • Sixth Hampton Roads Adaptation Forum: September 19, 2014, 8:30 AM - 3 PM at VMASC. Representatives from several of the sea level rise vulnerability/data mapping tools sorted through the available options. A federal agency representative talked about the new National Climate Assessment and its implications for Hampton Roads. For more details, see here ... Read more ...

  • Climate Data Initiative: Chesapeake Bay Hackathon: The Hackathon will take place on November 8-9, 2014. The Hackathon will comprise two intense 12-hour sessions of programing of products that will use data to generate relevant information for the people in Hampton Roads to better handle the challenges of climate change and sea level rise. Read more ...


LATEST NEWS

[September 21, 2014] Here is what you can do: Desmond Tutu calls for tactics that beat apartheid to be used in climate fight: Desmond Tutu has called for an international campaign to boycott mining companies, oil corporations and other businesses involved in the trade of fossil fuels. Prior to this week's UN climate summit in New York, Tutu underlines the deep injustice in the fact that those who contribute least to climate change are suffereing most. Read the article in The Guardian ...

[September 19, 2014] Population explosion likely to continue in the 21st Century: A new study led by Patrick Gerland, United Nations Population Division in New York, and published in Science concludes that there is a high probability (80%) that the rapid growth of the global population will continue throughout the 21st century. This lowers the chances to mitigate climate change and manage its impacts. Read a summary here. Fred Pierce points out that it is not overpopulation that causes climate change, but rather overconsumption - see the article in The Guardian here ...

[September 17, 2014] Impacts of disaster are increasing: Reuters reports that in 2013, natural hazards uproot 22 million people globally, twices as many as 40 years ago (read the article ...). The number of people affected by disaster due to natural hazards is expected to continue rise. Rising sea level will contribute to this. For Australia alone, the damage could be as much as $226 billion (read the article in The Guardian ...). Unlike most people think, fixing climate change may actually not add any costs, finds a study discussed in an article in the New York Times ...

[September 14, 2014] Cities impacted by growing natural hazards largely have to rely on own resources: An article in Governing underlines the fact that in the absence of adaptation program on state or federal levels many of the U.S. cities facing increasing climate-related hazards have to increase resilience to cope with the problems. Interestingly, the few readers' comments are from non-experts doubting the reality of human-caused climate change.

[September 9, 2014] Virginia Secure Commonwealth Sub-panel report discussed in the press: The Bay Journal discussed the report's recommendation concerning emergency management. Read the article ...

[September 4, 2014] Sea level rise in the press, and Norfolk is mentioned again and again: Two examples of recent reports on the threat of sea level rise are the article in Governing.com and the study by Reuters. In both cases, Norfolk is mentioned as a place already severely impacted. As the Reuters study concludes, mitigating the impacts of sea level rise is causing increasing costs for the American tax payer.

[September 2, 2014] The link between diets and climate changes: A new study, published today in Nature Climate Change, suggests that — if current trends continue — food production alone will reach, if not exceed, the global targets for total greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in 2050. The study shows that increased deforestation, fertilizer use and livestock methane emissions are likely to cause GHG from food production to increase by almost 80%. This will put emissions from food production alone roughly equal to the target greenhouse gas emissions in 2050 for the entire global economy. Read more ...

[August 29, 2014] Is our civilization heading for the irreversibel collapse?: A Nasa-funded study under the leading of Safa Motesharrei finds that our industrial civilization might be heading for 'irreversible collapse'. An interdisciplinary team of natural and social scientists developed a new model of how 'perfect storm' of crises could unravel global system. Although Hampton Roads is focused on the challenge of sea level rise, the real threat may be in the unsustainability of our global society. See the news article in The Guardian; get information on the model used here.

[August 25, 2014] Divergent Perception and Reality: The latest survey of Hampton Roads' population revealed that there is a large discrepancy between reality and people's perception of the impacts of sea level rise, with the respondents tending to ignore the impacts and assuming falsly that responsibility for the damage caused by flooding is with the property insurances. Read the full article ...

[August 16, 2014] Planning for Climate Change: In an article titled “As Climate Changes, 'Underwater Mortgage' May Take on New Meaning” James Tarmy discusses the key criteria that young people should consider with respect to climate change impacts on their lives over their long live. He finds that most studies simply come down to “a question of temperature, coastal cities, and water availability — those are the big driving forces.” Read the full article ...

[August 15, 2014] Children are on the front line of climate change: A UNICEF Report published in April 2014 states that children and young people, who represent 30% of the world's population, represent the largest most vulnerable group of people currently affected by climate change. They also are the group that has to deliver the deepest cut in carbon emissions needed to reduce climate change. An article in the Guardian points out that they, who own the risk, are seen but not heard and summarizes ways of how children could be involved in the dialog about climate change.

[August 1, 2014] ODU named one of 50 great affordable eco-friendly colleges by Best Choice Schools: ODU is included in the list of the “50 Great Affordable Eco-Friendly Colleges” published by “Best Choice Schools published recently. ODU is number 32 in this list. After the news was posted on ODU's Facebook page, ODU friends reacted very positively to the news (see the screen shot to the right). See the full list ...